COOK AND SONS -  FAUX FINISHES and WALL COVERINGS
Stage front
Stage front
The panels have been primed with light orange primer
Door beside stage
Door beside stage
Door has been primed as well
Brown oil glaze
Brown oil glaze
Glaze applied and then worked with cardboard
Woodgrain starts to appear
Woodgrain starts to appear
Rocker tool used to effect the graining
Heavy woodgrain lines
Heavy woodgrain lines
Darkest lines set in first
Wood pores
Wood pores
Next the fine pore lines effected by floging
Woodgrain
Woodgrain
Now the overall look is of a fine old wood finish
Finished product
Finished product
After a flat clear varnish is applied no one would know that this "wood" was ever painted
The Door
The Door
Doors came out good too!
Click on pictures to enlarge

Faux Wood Graining



This process has to be my favorite

The stage front here was glossy white when we walked in to the auditorium.

This old auditorium is part of the Mercer University campus.  It is used for special speakers and invited guests so they thought it would be a good idea to renovate it.  [Especially since Former President Jimmy Carter was coming soon to speak here]

So they hired the premier interior designer in town to over see the renovation, and she hired us to change the white stage front back to woodgrain.

Little did she know this was to date the largest woodgrain simulation we had ever undertaken.

Well, first we got the color of wood we needed to copy.

Then we picked out this burnt orangish color as the base for the wood color.

Then we practiced with different ways to simulate wood and actuall used three of them on this project.

Oil base glaze is used for the darker woodgrain lines.  Thin it considerably.  It will always come too thick to work with easily.

One is using the rough edge of a torn cardboard box.

Two is using a rocker tool that is made to simulate the heart grain and knots.  Just drag it along the direction of the grain of the wood.

Three is flogging with a long bristle brush to simulate the pores in the wood.  Apply a thin coat of glaze and slap the glaze with the flat side of the bristles in the same direction as the heavier lines.

Then of course we used clear to finish it off.

Since the designer wanted to keep the old stately feel of the project, we used a dead flat varnish.

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